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Activated Clotting Time Tubes


NOTE: THE FORMULATION HAS CHANGED FROM DIATOMACEOUS EARTH TO KAOLIN.  THIS HAS NO EFFECT ON TUBE EFFICACY.

For Veterinary Use Only

The activated clotting time (ACT) is commonly used in veterinary medicine as an assessment of dysfunction within the intrinsic clotting cascade.1 The ACT can be used on-site to quickly evaluate and diagnose secondary hemostasis from a myriad of conditions such as  rodenticide toxicosis and other disorders characterized by a decrease in clotting factors.

Haematologic Technologies SCAT-ACT tube draws 2 mL of blood into 12 milligrams of Kaolin (6 milligrams per mL blood).

Normal Clotting Values*:
Dogs < 120 seconds
Cats < 100 seconds
Cow < 145 seconds
Horse < 45 seconds

* The above values are taken from the literature from use with tubes of a different brand of tube, and should only be used as a guideline.

FOR VETERINARY USE ONLY!

Tubes are non-sterile. We recommend phlebotomy be done with a catheter of at least five inches in length, which is equipped with a multi-sample luer adapter (MSLA).

SCAT-ACT tubes have not been validated in any controlled animal studies, and Haematologic Technologies makes no claims of performance or suitability as a screening test for coagulopathy. The responsibility for achieving accurate and clinically useful results with SCAT-ACT tubes rests solely with the Veterinarian and/or individual performing the test. Good laboratory practice dictates that each clinic should establish its own reference values by running 5 to 10 known normal animals.

Haematologic Technologies, Inc. is NOT responsible for any injuries or illness that may occur as a result from the use of these tubes.

FOR VETERINARY USE ONLY!

Tubes are non-sterile.  We recommend phlebotomy be done with a catheter of at least five inches in length, which is equipped with a multi-sample luer adapter (MSLA).

SCAT-ACT tubes have not been validated in any controlled animal studies, and Haematologic Technologies makes no claims of performance or suitability as a screening test for coagulopathy.  The responsibility for achieving accurate and clinically useful results with SCAT-ACT tubes rests solely with the Veterinarian and/or individual performing the test.  Good laboratory practice dictates that each clinic should establish its own reference values by running 5 to 10 known normal animals.

Handling and Use of the Haematologic Technologies SCAT-ACT blood collection tube

This document describes the process for handling and using the SCAT-ACT blood collection tube.  These tubes are intended for veterinary use only, and are not sterile.

  1. The tubes should be stored at room temperature.  These tubes do not need to be refrigerated, and should not be frozen.
  2. Prior to collection, a water bath or heating block should be set to 37°C.
  3. Preheat the collection tubes to be used to 37°C for 5-10 minutes.
    1. The accuracy of this test depends on the tubes being at as close to 37°C as possible to eliminate prolonged or variable results which can occur at room temperature.
  4. Perform a clean venipuncture of the cephalic (leg) vein, and discard the first 1-2 mL of blood to eliminate any extrinsic clotting activation.
  5. A timer should be started once the SCAT-ACT tube begins collection.
  6. The tube should be gently rocked five times, and placed back into the 37°C water bath or heating block.
  7. After 50 seconds, the tube should be removed and checked for clotting by gently tilting the tube lengthwise in front of a light source.
  8. Replace the tube in the heat source and continue to check every 5 seconds.
  9. Once an unmistakable thickening or clumping has formed the timer should be stopped.  Do not wait for a complete, solid clot to stop the timer. 

Normal Values:

                                    Dogs   < 120 seconds

                                    Cats    < 100 seconds

                                    Cow    < 145 seconds

                                    Horse  < 45 seconds

* The above values are taken from the literature from use with tubes of a different brand, and should only be used as a guideline.

  1. Shane W. Bateman DVM, DVSc, Karol A. Mathews DVM, DVSc (1999) Comparison of Axillary And Heating Block Methods of Activated Clotting Time (ACT) in Dogs; Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care 9 (2) , 79–82 doi:10.1111/j.1476-4431.1999.tb00073.x
  2. Meyer, Coles and Rich: Evaluation of Hemostasis and Coagulation Disorders in Veterinary Laboratory Medicine.  Philadelphia , W.B. Saunders, 1987, 43-49.
  3. Tvedten, Harold: Hemostatis Abnormalities in Small Animal Clinical Diagnosis by Laboratory Methods edited by Willard, Tvedten, and Turnwald. Philadelphia , W.B. Saunders 1989, pp. 86-101.
  4. Riley, J.H. and E.D. Lassen: Activated Coagulation Times of Normal Cows.  Veterinary Clinical Pathology 1979, VIII, p. 31